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Hours

  • 10:00 am - 5:00 pm daily
  • Closed Christmas and Thanksgiving

Admission

  • Adult - $20.95 + tax
  • Child - $12.95 + tax (2 thru 12)
  • Child - free (under 2)
  • Senior - $16.95 + tax (65+)
Driving Directions

Featured Animals

Yellow-crowned night heron

Specializing in crayfish, crabs, and other crustaceans, this small heron has gourmet tastes. Once considered a rather tropical bird, it has expanded its North American range in recent years to the north and west. It is also found throughout Central and South America. It has nested repeatedly in this exhibit, performing courtship displays and raising chicks.

Electric eel

Not related to saltwater or migratory eels, this South American fish has an elegantly minimal method of moving through water. This is mostly achieved by a parabolic wave generated through the long ventral fin. The tiny pectoral fins may steer. Most of the body is taken up by electricity generating tissue. An adult may produce a 500-watt charge. The digestive and reproductive organs are confined to a small area just behind the head. Exhibited at New York's Central Park Zoo more than a century ago, it has long been a popular aquarium display.

Bearded saki

Though it is not at all rare in its native Northeastern South America, this startling-looking monkey has always been very rare in zoos. It had a reputation for being delicate in captivity, but since their arrival in Dallas in 2010, the ones at the DWA have proved robust, and have already produced offspring. They differ from White-faced sakis (whose tails usually hang straight down) by the continuous motion of their remarkably squirrel-like tails.

Recent Articles

AMBASSADORS AT THE DWA

“Welcome to the DWA” — frequently said by many of our ambassadors as you begin your journey through the rainforest....

TOO CUTE — Pudu fawn!

We want to introduce you to one of the cutest babies at The Dallas World Aquarium — our Southern pudu...

IT’S A SQUIRREL? … IT’S AN OPOSSUM? … IT’S A SLOTH?…

The identification of the mammal at the top of our general admissions entrance area seems to stump everyone who sees...