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Hours

Effective Tuesday, September 2, we will change our opening time to 10:00 am.
  • 9:00 am - 5:00 pm daily
  • Closed Christmas and Thanksgiving

Admission

  • Adult - $20.95 + tax
  • Child - $12.95 + tax (2 thru 12)
  • Child - free (under 2)
  • Senior - $16.95 + tax (65+)
Driving Directions

Featured Animals

Plate-billed mountain toucan

Not seen in collections until the 1960s, this strangely beautiful bird from the cool Andean forests of Colombia and Ecuador was kept by a number of places in the 1970s and '80s, and several were hatched. Today it is rare in captivity, but the DWA has recently been repeatedly propagating it. Because its mountain habitat continues to disappear, it is considered Near Threatened.

Leather coral

Named for their appearance, which can resemble a baseball glove, the Leather coral, or Toadstool coral is found in various shades of brown, green, or yellow with white or gold polyps. It can be difficult to identify leather corals because many of them are similar in appearance. As they grow older, they develop a folded appearance. Like other soft corals, Leather corals incorporate tiny, single celled algae, known as zooxanthellae in their tissues.

White-capped clownfish

The White-capped clownfish is named for the white color mark on its forehead. The name "leucokranos" is derived from the Greek word meaning "white capped" or "white helmet". It was discovered in 1972 in Mandang, New Guinea. As is the case in our Solomon Islands exhibit, the White capped clownfish is often associated with the Carpet anemone, Stichodactyla sp., and rarely strays far from the protection of its stinging tentacles. A thick mucous coating on its skin keeps the clownfish from being stung.

Recent Articles

AMBASSADORS AT THE DWA

“Welcome to the DWA” — frequently said by many of our ambassadors as you begin your journey through the rainforest....

TOO CUTE — Pudu fawn!

We want to introduce you to one of the cutest babies at The Dallas World Aquarium — our Southern pudu...

IT’S A SQUIRREL? … IT’S AN OPOSSUM? … IT’S A SLOTH?…

The identification of the mammal at the top of our general admissions entrance area seems to stump everyone who sees...