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Hours

  • 9:00 am - 5:00 pm daily
  • Closed Christmas and Thanksgiving

Admission

  • Adult - $20.95 + tax
  • Child - $14.95 + tax (2 thru 12)
  • Child - free (under 2)
  • Senior - $16.95 + tax (65+)
Driving Directions

Featured Animals

Golden tanager

There are at least 47 species of small, jewel-like tanagers in the genus Tangara, making this the largest genus of purely Tropical American birds. The DWA displays more than a dozen, probably the most extensive public exhibit. They are particularly concentrated along the Andes, as is this species, which is found from Venezuela to Bolivia. Although now seldom seen in zoos, it has bred repeatedly in captivity since the 1950s.

Harlequin Shrimp

The colorful pattern of the Harlequin or Clown shrimp makes this beautiful crustacean quite popular. Its white or cream colored body is covered with distinctive red and purple spots. It has ten legs; the first pair are modified large, flattened claws (chelipeds). The eyes are located on stalks. The first pair of antennae on the head resemble a flattened leaf that sense the smell of nearby prey.

Capuchinbird

This strange bird, with its bald head and huge dark eyes, is also known as the Calf bird, because of its remarkably loud deep call. Like the Cock-of-the-rock, it is a member of the Cotinga family, found only in Tropical America. Its range is defined by the intersection of three rivers: Amazon, Orinoco, and Rio Negro. Though first taken into captivity nearly 60 years ago, it has always been a treasured rarity in zoos. Until the DWA achieved multiple successes in 2011, the only full captive breedings had been at San Diego Zoo, in the 1990s.

Recent Articles

AMBASSADORS AT THE DWA

“Welcome to the DWA” — frequently said by many of our ambassadors as you begin your journey through the rainforest....

TOO CUTE — Pudu fawn!

We want to introduce you to one of the cutest babies at The Dallas World Aquarium — our Southern pudu...

IT’S A SQUIRREL? … IT’S AN OPOSSUM? … IT’S A SLOTH?…

The identification of the mammal at the top of our general admissions entrance area seems to stump everyone who sees...