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Hours

  • 10:00 am - 5:00 pm daily
  • Closed Christmas and Thanksgiving

Admission

  • Adult - $20.95 + tax
  • Child - $12.95 + tax (2 thru 12)
  • Child - free (under 2)
  • Senior - $16.95 + tax (65+)
Driving Directions

Featured Animals

Seba’s short-tailed bat

In zoos, colonies of this species are like yeast -- a few sent to another zoo soon reproduce to the carrying capacity of their exhibit, and more colonies can be established from there. From a few importations more than 30 years ago, there are now more than 6,000 of these fruit-eating bats distributed among more than 30 North American collections. This is a widespread species, found from Mexico to Paraguay. In the Mayan epic, the Popol Vuh, a bat, Zotz, stole the head of the Hero God Hunahpu for the Gods of the Underworld to use in a ballgame.

Budgett’s frog

Named after J. S. Budgett, who studied lungfish, bichers, and amhibians in South America and Africa over a hundred years ago, this unique frog could be said to resemble a cross between a hippopotamus and a potato. Even the tadpoles have enormous mouths and are cannibals, making their propagation difficult for amphibian keepers. They do not have teeth, but can inflict painful bites with sharp-edged structures in the jaws. Found in Paraguay, Argentina, and Bolivia, these relatives of the horned frogs were very rare in captivity before the 1980s.

Central American agouti

Weighing up to eight pounds, this rodent is considered delicious and is hunted by humans throughout its range, from the Mexican state of Chiapas through Central America to northern South America. It has also been introduced to Cuba and the Cayman Islands. They eat fruit and nuts, which they hold in their paws like a squirrel. They have two to four young at a time. Males and females form permanent pairs, though males stay away while the female is nursing. They may live up to 20 years, an unusual longevity for a rodent.

Recent Articles

AMBASSADORS AT THE DWA

“Welcome to the DWA” — frequently said by many of our ambassadors as you begin your journey through the rainforest....

TOO CUTE — Pudu fawn!

We want to introduce you to one of the cutest babies at The Dallas World Aquarium — our Southern pudu...

IT’S A SQUIRREL? … IT’S AN OPOSSUM? … IT’S A SLOTH?…

The identification of the mammal at the top of our general admissions entrance area seems to stump everyone who sees...